Attention all Hams and SWL

Comments: 3 Comments
Published on: March 15, 2006

Qrz is reporting that we might see a massive spike in sun spot activity. I don’t know much about how this will affect people into astronomy. But I do know that this will affect RF on earth. It will not help me on the Ham radio band since I do not work on the bands of 6 meters or below. I can work 6 meters, techs are allowed on it, but below 6 meters I can not go on legally. But here is what is exciting me, this should make listening to the Short Wave Radio fun, since the RF in these area of the bands will be able to travel better under high sunspot activity.

3 Comments
  1. Rob says:

    Mike,

    You will be able to observe a response on 2m!

    Solar storms tend to be common at the same time as sunspots. Solar storms are what causes aurorae.

    If you have your 2m radio out, during a good aurora, you can use the aurora to bounce signals off! Since the aurora are way up in the atmosphere, these reflections greatly extend your line of sight!

    When listening to an aurorally-bounced signal, you’ll hear a wavering that’s diagnostic for an auroral opening.

    Other things will happen, including tranatlantic 6m Dx!

    You really want a 2m SSB and 6m SSB. This stuff is easier to do on SSB than FM.

  2. Thanks for the information, well I might have to consider getting a all mode radio for 2 and 6 meters, I only have have 2 meters and 70 centimeters capabilities on FM. I do need to waint till get set on my new job, this month and next month will be a bit tight because of the job switch. What radio would you suggest?

  3. Rob says:

    Go to a ham fest with someone and see if you can’t pick up an older, used 2m all-mode or 6m. I’m not so sure about eBay.

    I haen’t looked into getting radios for a while — a kit might save you a lot of money, esp. for 6m SSB and CW. 6m and 2m CW are excellent places for you to practice CW, if you want, as is 10 m.

    Here’s an article on working 6m Dx.

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